It wasn’t just a job: It was personal!

Dear Friends, As many of you have already read, I have retired from Hearing Health & Technology Matters (HHTM) after four extremely rewarding years as a founding editor. But before leaving the scene, I have some parting words for our readers, whom I have been writing for and about for longer than I could ever have…

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Hearing Health & Technology Matters

HHTM names Wayne Staab editor-in-chief, as David Kirkwood retires; Brian Taylor joins blog as news editor

  TUCSON, AZ—Hearing Health & Technology Matters (HHTM) has named Wayne Staab, PhD, a founding partner of the popular blog, as Editor-in-Chief effective today (June 1), succeeding David H. Kirkwood. Kirkwood, who was also a founding partner of HHTM, has retired after 42 years as an editor, including 25 years covering hearing health care. He…

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Newborn hearing screening test may hold the key to saving babies from SIDS

By David H. Kirkwood SEATTLE—Imagine that when a newborn infant is screened for hearing loss, as is done routinely in every U.S. state and in many other countries, the same test could also determine if the baby is at risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), the mysterious condition that kills some 4000 seemingly healthy…

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Cochlear

Chris Smith, head of Cochlear Americas, named to top job at world’s largest CI manufacturer

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA–Chris Smith, who has been head of operations in North America for Cochlear for more than a decade will become CEO of the Australian-based parent company, Cochlear announced on May 25. He will succeed Chris Roberts, who has been CEO of Cochlear, the world’s largest manufacturer of cochlear implants, since 2003. Smith, who will…

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hi HealthInnovations’ hearing test: Will it steer patients to or away from hearing professionals?

 By David H. Kirkwood MINNETONKA, MN—Hearing care providers have long believed that a recommendation from a primary-care physician (PCP) is one of the most compelling factors in motivating people to get help for their hearing loss. That’s why for years the Hearing Industries Association (HIA) marketed to GPs, family practitioners, and internal medicine physicians, urging…

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Celebrating 35 years, HLAA will honor Rocky Stone, Tom Harkin at 2015 convention

ST. LOUIS–The Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA) will celebrate the late Howard E. “Rocky” Stone, its charismatic founder, and also honor former Senator Tom Harkin, another hero of the disability rights movement, during its annual convention June 25-28 at the St. Louis Union Station Hotel.   REMEMBERING ROCKY STONE Since last fall, America’s leading…

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Fit to Serve bill wins support from a leading senator

WASHINGTON, DC—The Fit to Serve campaign, designed to allow and encourage the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to hire licensed hearing aid specialists to treat veterans with hearing loss, got a boost when U.S. Senator Charles E. Schumer (D-NY) announced on May 8 that he would sponsor the Veterans Hearing Aid Access and Assistance Act…

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Justin Osmond runs 250 miles to help kids get hearing aids

  ST. GEORGE, UTAH—After running 250 miles over eight days through wind and cold, hail and snow, up steep mountain roads that reached nearly 8000 feet in altitude, a physically and emotionally spent Justin Osmond crossed the finish line in St. George on Saturday, May 9, arms raised in triumph. There to meet the celebrated…

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Big Six, Beware: Samsung May Soon Enter the Hearing Aid Arena

  SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA—The consumer electronics titan Samsung is making plans that could shake up the hearing aid industry, according to a report published April 27 in the online publication BusinessKorea. After watching the successes of the partnerships that its industry rival Apple has forged with GN ReSound and Starkey Hearing Technologies, Samsung appears ready to invest in the…

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Wells Fargo ad with two “mommies” adopting a deaf child creates lots of buzz

    By David H. Kirkwood SAN FRANCISCO—For decades, advertising, especially television and print campaigns aimed at a broad national audience, has been an accurate barometer of public attitudes in America toward various minority groups. In casting models and actors—or selecting “real people” to appear as themselves—for ads, agencies try to present people that the…

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