The Internal Auditory Meatus (IAM): It’s neuroanatomy & comment

by Frank E. Musiek   Introduction The internal auditory meatus (IAM) is a canal in the temporal bone that extends from the bony cochlea medially to an opening in the posterior aspect of the petrous portion of the temporal bone. This structure is germane to audiologists because it contains three nerves of interest to audiologists:…

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The Contralateral Ear Effect on Tests of Central Auditory Function: An Introduction

Frank Musiek     Introduction   Back in the 1950’s Ettore Bocca and his Italian colleagues (Bocca, Calearo, Cassinari, 1954) were the first to develop and make significant clinical use of central auditory tests. They had learned that the pure tone audiogram was not useful in reflecting deficits of the central auditory nervous system (CANS).…

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An Account of Some Relationships Between Otoacoustic Emissions and the Olivocochlear Bundle

Aaron Whiteley   The focused examination of otoacoustic emissions began in the 1940s with Georg von Bekesy. Inspired, yet unconvinced by Helmholtz’ idea that the cochlea consisted of resonant structures, Bekesy developed an intricate method of examination that would lead to the place theory and traveling wave theory (Hall, 2000). Bekesy’s experiments built the foundation…

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Reflections on the cochlear nucleus (CNu) and some early clinical studies

Frank E. Musiek   There is no question that considerable research has been conducted on the cochlear nucleus in recent years. Anatomists, physiologists, psycho-acousticians, audiologists and others have made contributions to our understanding of the CNu. However, in reflection on some current research of the CNu I kept thinking about some very early research which…

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