Decrement in Noise Test (DeNT): A Clinical Measure of Partially Filled Gap Detection Performance

by Julianne M. Ceruti, Au.D., Ph.D., Leslie Bernstein, Ph.D., and Frank Musiek, Ph.D.   The Decrement in Noise Test (DeNT) is a clinically oriented procedure modeled after the GIN test that employs both partially filled gaps (i.e., decrements) and full gaps. This test was developed to improve clinical assessment of temporal resolution that addresses the…

Read More

The Internal Auditory Meatus (IAM): It’s neuroanatomy & comment

by Frank E. Musiek   Introduction The internal auditory meatus (IAM) is a canal in the temporal bone that extends from the bony cochlea medially to an opening in the posterior aspect of the petrous portion of the temporal bone. This structure is germane to audiologists because it contains three nerves of interest to audiologists:…

Read More

Beyond Controversies: Commentary on Central Auditory Processing Disorder (Part II)

This article is republished with permission from Hearing Review   By Gail D. Chermak, PhD, Frank E. Musiek, PhD, and Jeffrey Weihing, PhD In part 1 of this article, the authors presented their perspectives on a number of issues, including the importance of well-defined participants to maximize the validity of research and draw accurate conclusions,…

Read More

An Account of Some Relationships Between Otoacoustic Emissions and the Olivocochlear Bundle

Aaron Whiteley   The focused examination of otoacoustic emissions began in the 1940s with Georg von Bekesy. Inspired, yet unconvinced by Helmholtz’ idea that the cochlea consisted of resonant structures, Bekesy developed an intricate method of examination that would lead to the place theory and traveling wave theory (Hall, 2000). Bekesy’s experiments built the foundation…

Read More