child screen time hearing loss

Screen Time For Kids With Hearing Loss

There has been discussion about how much screen time is reasonable for children. When my children were growing up it was less of a problem. The only “screen” was the TV and somehow, even then, I knew that we had to limit time. They were allowed one hour a day. When they were little it was only Sesame Street. As they got older they got to choose what to watch in their hour. My son was very sneaky. He would lie on the floor in the dining room near the entry to the living room where the TV was and pretend to do homework while my daughter watched her hour of TV.

 

Things are more complicated now. There are so many hand held devices that we all depend on and use constantly. There are two issues which cause problems for all children and especially for children with hearing loss and other language issues. First, adults caring for children seem to spend less time talking with the child and more time on devices.

 

As I walk down the street I almost never see adults talking with children in strollers – they are either talking or texting on their devices. So the first problem is significantly less language input. VERY BAD!!!

 

The second problem is time the children spend personally connected to devices. We have all seen little ones in strollers watching something on an iPhone or iPad. Again, this means that on one is talking with them. But there is an additional problem. A study by the Hospital For Sick Children in Toronto reported that at the 18 month well baby checkup parents reported that the children had a daily average handheld device use of 28 minutes. The researchers used a screening tool for language delay and reported that for each 30 minute increase in handheld screen time translated into a 49% increased risk of expressive speech delay.

 

In a study by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association reported that Audiologists and speech-language pathologists were concerned about screen time and it effect of reduced opportunities for social interaction, delayed speech or language development, and academic problems. Only 3 % of professionals surveyed had no concern about screen time.

 

Limiting Screen Time

 

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that screen time be discouraged for children less than 18 months. I would say that is a minimum recommendations. We should be spending as much time as possible talking with our children. I do understand that watching a video is a great babysitting tool. We can be sure where the children are and that they are safe while we do what we need to do. But we need to figure out a way to reduce screen time and increase face to face time. We need to absolutely have limits. I absolutely believe that we should have almost no screen time below age two and then limit it to no more than one hour with the rest of the child’s life having face to face communication.

 

Face to face communication – talking – is especially critical for children with hearing loss who need more exposure to learn and who do not have as much access to overhearing or incidental learning which children with typical hearing have. And let’s remember that 90% of what children learn they learn by overhearing. So let’s turn everything off and talk talk talk to our kids. And for kids with hearing loss? Talk talk talk talk talk talk talk. And listen.

 

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About Jane Madell

Jane Madell has a consulting practice in pediatric audiology. She is an audiologist, speech-language pathologist, and LSLS auditory verbal therapist, with a BA from Emerson College and an MA and PhD from the University of Wisconsin. Her 45+ years experience ranges from Deaf Nursery programs to positions at the League for the Hard of Hearing (Director), Long Island College Hospital, Downstate Medical Center, Beth Israel Medical Center/New York Eye and Ear Infirmary as director of the Hearing and Learning Center and Cochlear Implant Center. Jane has taught at the University of Tennessee, Columbia University, Downstate Medical School, and Albert Einstein Medical School, published 5 books, and written numerous books chapters and journal articles, and is a well known international lecturer.

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Jerome Evans

I been struggling with these studies. Most of my child’s (now 2) screen time is educational. One day he was watching sesame street at age 1. They taught how to swing a bat and he was imitating that action. He surely wouldn’t have learned that from me at age 1. He also listens to many songs on youtube including Twinkle twinkle little start (English and Spanish) and now sings both (again he wouldn’t have learned the Spanish version as well from me). He also listens to his ABC. I can only sing the ABC’s about 10 times before I say… Read more »