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US Hearing Device Patents for May 2017

  Made for iPhone hearing aids came first and most smart hearing aids are still not “made” for android devices. The Internet of things reachable by hearing aids is limited to a small, picky universe. In the larger universe, my android phone and Samsung washing machine may be having lively discourse, but I’m not privy…

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US Hearing Device Patents for April 2017

Audiologists and hearing scientists are familiar with human equal loudness contours (feature image above).  Samsung is too, using those contours in its patent #9635459 to control signal input gain to protect against noise induced hearing loss.    Samsung Exits the Ear to Aid Hearing   Or, better yet, why not fully protect the ear and hearing…

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from patent buddy

Dominance in a Patent Class

Charting patent trends can track technological innovation and stagnation by proxy variables such as geography (countries, metropolitan areas), industry concentration, education (proximity of universities, proportion of PhDs), income per capita, etc. One measure is growth and dominance of patent classes by an industry or company.  Of interest to the hearing aid industry is its representation…

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Emily Blunt Calling, Courtesy of Samsung

  Samsung phone and washer technologies exploded in 2016, but and not in a good way.  Thankfully, those technologies didn’t show up in hearing aids because Samsung has yet to enter the FDA-approved US hearing aid market, despite strong expectations that it would do so in 2016. That hasn’t stopped Samsung from its end run…

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US Hearing Device Patents for December 2016

The number of hearing device patents granted annually to the Big 6 manufacturers tripled in the last decade (see feature image above), peaking in 2012 and leveling off since then, by Hearing Economic’s estimation.1   The 2012 peak is mainly due to a flurry of patents awarded to Siemens (now Sivantos) that year.   Sivantos…

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