Audiologists Gone Wild. A PG13 Post.

Shhhh.  This is a test.  Last week’s post described high-level healthcare fraud by its defining characteristics and discussed Audiologists’ healthcare fraud exposure at the end.  Readership was not high compared to the Zombie post that preceded it. Two hypotheses are put forth to explain observed differences in Audiologists’ reading preferences: H1:   Audiologists are way too…

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Wrong Again: White Coat Fraud and Government Regulation Take It Out to the Parking Lot

 Hearing Economics is juggling several series right now, including one on regulation of professional practices and another on professional theft and fraud.  They’re running in parallel as a reminder that theft is not only immoral and unethical, it’s powerfully destructive.  Innovative, over-the-top frauds can influence Government policy and spending at least as much as powerful…

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To Regulate or Not To Regulate, That is the Question

The last post on Government regulation introduced gluts and shortages, both undesirable, inefficient and unsustainable–theoretically– in a free market. “Theoretically” because the free market of classical economics is modeled on a world of “complete information, interchangeable goods and services, and lack of market power” — a world that exists only in theory.  Laissez-faire{{1}}[[1]]tr:  Leave [us] alone.[[1]]  gets…

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Back to the Future, Part VI: Slogging Through the Mine Field

Editor’s note:  This series follows predictions by Lars Kolind[1] in the 1990s.   So far, this series has negotiated all sorts of land mines, chief among them Audiologists as Retailers, Vanishing Practitioner Autonomy, Internet Dispensing, Consumer Expectations, Vertical Distribution, Technological Dominance, Dispensers and Audiologists as Bedfellows, and Ruthless Demand Curves.  Where’s the love?  Unfortunately not in today’s post, which…

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