In Defense of Costco

Am I suggesting that everyone go work for Costco? No, but I think those who do probably deserve more respect than they get.  David Kirkwood The hearing impaired should be offered the widest possible selection of instrumentation and dispensing models.  One size does not fit everyone.   K. Ray Katz  Costco has rapidly emerged as the…

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British Columbia: Brent and The Beastie Boys Do Economics

I had the distinct pleasure and honor of speaking to the British Columbia Association of Speech/Language Pathologists & Audiologists (BCASLPA) on October 13, 2012.  Although I cannot say those who attended my session felt as honored, I can say that the small but hardy group stayed with me for a full 5.5 hours while we…

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Government Regulation of Hearing Healthcare, part 2

Several posts ago, Hearing Economics looked at the Supply Curve in a free market and likened independent Audiologists to wheat farmers, in the sense that they exercise little if any influence on Pricing.  That post evoked comment from a regular reader: C:  Holly, you using the analogy of how hearing aid professionals are like wheat…

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Econ 101: Supply Curves and Willingness to Sell

Q:  “Does it really cost $600 or more for the manufacturer to ship a hearing aid to me versus to Costco or the VA?” Sincerely, RR Last post considered RR’s plaint that big competitors’ product Costs are lower than his, so his profit margins are necessarily smaller than theirs, no matter how careful he is with…

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Econ 101: If Hearing Aids Were Hula Hoops

This occasional series has taken intrepid readers through economic concepts such as Utility, Decreasing Marginal Benefit and Willingness to Pay — all assumptions underlying the downward-sloping Price/Quantity Demanded curve that we call a Demand Curve.  As those posts illustrated with Jack and Jill’s different Utilities,  analyzing the logic of consumer choices given their limited resources…

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