Hearing Economics Hits the Century Mark and Contemplates the Meaning of Life

Hearing Economics has clawed its way to the 100-post peak today, a dubious achievement signifying either celebration or an urgent need to jump off and get a life.  A third option is to figure out the meaning of life by writing yet another post.  The following are weird, funny, disconcerting, or just plain embarrassing items…

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Influenza and Audiologists: In Harm’s Way

Last week’s post ended in high dudgeon at the prospect of hearing professionals violating the Harm Principle by foregoing flu shots.  In the meantime, the flu marches on:  For the second week in a row,  flu deaths exceeded the epidemic threshold; 49.6% of hospital flu admissions were in those 65 and over, 48 states reported the…

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But That Would Still Be Wrong: Moral and Ethical Decisions in Hearing Healthcare

A few weeks ago, Hearing Economics ventured into Ethical territory — not a place Economists like to visit though it’s part of the job.  Nevertheless, we’re back in that quagmire of bad decisions, their effects on practices, and whether they are Moral Temptations or true Ethical Dilemmas.  The latter surface when there is a clash…

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Back to the Future, Part VI: Slogging Through the Mine Field

Editor’s note:  This series follows predictions by Lars Kolind[1] in the 1990s.   So far, this series has negotiated all sorts of land mines, chief among them Audiologists as Retailers, Vanishing Practitioner Autonomy, Internet Dispensing, Consumer Expectations, Vertical Distribution, Technological Dominance, Dispensers and Audiologists as Bedfellows, and Ruthless Demand Curves.  Where’s the love?  Unfortunately not in today’s post, which…

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