Do High Profits Stymie Innovation and Swell Prices? Unsticking Adam Smith’s Hand

“Signal & Noise” is a bimonthly column by Brian Taylor, AuD.   Profits are an essential part of a free enterprise system. They provide employees and their families with an income, give shareholders a return, foster innovation and signal where capital needs to be invested in order to improve or grow a business.   Profit…

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Give the People What They Want, Part 2

“Signal & Noise” is a bimonthly column by Brian Taylor, AuD. Products and services that work relatively well for 25% of adults with hearing loss do not effectively address the wants and needs of the other 75%. The price and process of obtaining them are not in alignment with the needs of many. (paraphrased from…

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Samsung Comes Calling on the Hearing Device Industry

It makes sense for  companies like Apple and Samsung to gain competitive advantage through optimized supply chains that  “lock up key product and component supplies.” (4/21/15 post) Samsung Electronics agrees, judging by recent developments in its patent activity, infrastructure, component acquisitions, and newly announced products.  Moreover, Samsung Electronics thinks it makes especially good sense to focus on…

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Signal & Noise: Are We Entering the “Just Good Enough” Era?

Hearing Economics is pleased to announce Brian Taylor as a new columnist.  Dr. Taylor plans to help us get to core concepts in a series of bimonthly discussions entitled “Signal & Noise.”  Today’s post marks his debut column, describing actual data to bear on outcomes from available ear-level amplification technologies.  Welcome, Brian, and thanks for…

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Hearing Aids and Hearables: A Natural Pairing

These are the best of times and the worst of times, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us. (channeling Dickens for Audiologists) Audiologists may agree that we are living in extreme times.  It’s gratifying to practice our profession in the “communication obsessed 2000s” (Ridley, 2010), with ear-level devices at hand as the obvious…

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