Econ 202: Let Them Eat Cake, Monopolists at Work

“My position on cake is pro-having it, and pro-eating it.”  Boris Johnson, colorful British politician I’m with Boris and Marie on that one — cake for all… who can afford it.  And I want to make all the cakes.  In short, I’m a born Monopolist.  I’ll bet you are too.  So, why aren’t we all…

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Econ 202: When Supply Met Demand

We’ve graduated from Econ 101.  It’s time to take on Price Takers — companies that can influence Price to optimize their profits.   That’s going to take a few posts, starting with a rehash of  Econ 101 posts today.  Apologies to those who don’t like going into the weeds, but you really can’t talk about…

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For Whom the Bell Tolls: 101 Cash Flow Ways to Kill Your Practice

If a business is constantly struggling with its bottom line, this could create long-term problems from which it might not recover.   How dreary.  I promise to move to more upbeat topics soon. But for now, it’s Cash Flow problems–shorthand for “constantly struggling with the bottom line.”  Cash Flow was discussed in general last week…

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Audiologists Gone Wild. A PG13 Post.

Shhhh.  This is a test.  Last week’s post described high-level healthcare fraud by its defining characteristics and discussed Audiologists’ healthcare fraud exposure at the end.  Readership was not high compared to the Zombie post that preceded it. Two hypotheses are put forth to explain observed differences in Audiologists’ reading preferences: H1:   Audiologists are way too…

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Wrong Again: White Coat Fraud and Government Regulation Take It Out to the Parking Lot

 Hearing Economics is juggling several series right now, including one on regulation of professional practices and another on professional theft and fraud.  They’re running in parallel as a reminder that theft is not only immoral and unethical, it’s powerfully destructive.  Innovative, over-the-top frauds can influence Government policy and spending at least as much as powerful…

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