Frank Musiek brings Pathways to Hearing Health and Technology Matters

TUCSON, AZ–Frank E. Musiek, PhD, whose distinguished research career has contributed substantially to our fundamental understanding of the workings of the human auditory system, has joined the lineup of prominent audiologists at the blog Hearing Health and Technology Matters (HHTM).

Frank Musiek
Frank Musiek

Musiek’s new section, called Pathways, debuted March 26, the first day of the 2014 American Academy of Audiology Convention in Orlando. There, Musiek, a recipient of the Academy’s Jerger Career Award for Research in Audiology, is co-chairing a global conference, Clinical Populations with CAPD: What We Know and What Lies Ahead, being held March 28 and 29.

 

A NEW HOME FOR PATHWAYS

On Pathways, Musiek and his colleagues will write on topics related to CAPD (central auditory processing disorders) and neuroaudiology. For example, currently readers will find an overview of the N400 Event Related and Potential by Dara Kelly, a doctoral student at the University of Connecticut.

Pathways is in part a continuation of Musiek’s column by that name that appeared for many years in The Hearing Journal. However, it will be more than that. It will also serve as an online home for the Pathways Society, which Musiek and colleagues developed as a forum for individuals interested in issues in CAPD and related subjects. As Musiek explained, moving to HHTM will provide the Pathways Society with a larger audience and greater flexibility to provide news, clinical information, and research findings to readers.

Dr. Musiek can be reached at HHTM at FMusiek@Gmail.com

 

MOVING WEST

Frank Musiek’s move to Tucson-based HHTM coincides with his decision to relocate there this year and assume professorships at the University of Arizona Department of Speech Language and Hearing Sciences and at the University of Arizona Medical School.

Previously he spent 37 years in New England, 25 years on the faculty at Dartmouth University and 12 at the University of Connecticut, where he is currently director of auditory research in the Department of Communication Sciences and professor of otolaryngology in the School of Medicine.

A tireless researcher and prolific writer, Musiek has published over 160 refereed articles and made more than 600 presentations at conferences and symposia around the world. He has published nine books, authored more than 40 book chapters, and developed a number of clinical audiologic tests, three of which are mainstays of the clinical central auditory test battery.

He is also a dedicated teacher, who has seen many of his former students become leading audiologists and physicians.