mass eye ear hearing research donation

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Receives Anonymous $20 Million Donation to Study Hearing and Balance

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS — Massachusetts Eye and Ear has received the largest gift in its history, $20 million dollars, to study hearing and balance. The funding, provided by an anonymous donor, will go to the Eaton-Peabody Laboratory, housed within the hospital’s department of otolaryngology. Recruiting and funding new faculty chairs, and hearing researchers, will be top…

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Boston Marathon bombings are still taking a heavy toll on victims’ hearing

BOSTON—More than a year after the Boston Marathon bombings of April 15, 2013, scores of victims of the terrorist action are still suffering from hearing loss, tinnitus, and other conditions resulting from exposure to the two explosions. So report 15 physicians and audiologists writing in the December 2014 issue of Otology & Neurotology. In the…

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Low-power microchip may open door to a cochlear implant with no exterior parts

SAN FRANCISCO—What cochlear implant wearers have long yearned for—an entirely implantable system without the external transmitter, wire, microphone, and battery that are now standard—appears to have moved a step closer to reality this week. In a paper to be presented February 11 at the IEEE International Solid State Circuits Conference in San Francisco, researchers describe…

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Bombs at Boston Marathon expected to take a heavy toll on victims’ hearing

BOSTON—Everyone knows about the tragic loss of life caused by the two bombs that exploded last week near the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon. The grievous injuries to scores of spectators, which cost many of them their legs, have also been widely reported. However, it is almost certain that the explosions and the…

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Researchers regenerate hair cells in deafened mice and improve their hearing

By David H. Kirkwood BOSTON—When scientists finally discover a cure for sensorineural hearing loss, the key that unlocks the door for them will probably be some mechanism to stimulate the regeneration of sensory hair cells in the human cochlea. The toll that age, noise, ototoxic medicines, and infections take on these hair cells is the…

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