Robert Panara dies; was a founder of National Technical Institute for the Deaf

ROCHESTER, NY–Robert F. Panara, a pioneer in deaf education who was a founder of both the National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID) and the National Theater of the Deaf in Connecticut, died here on July 20 at age 94. Despite losing his hearing when he was only 10 as a result of spinal meningitis,…

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Ray Rich, former IHS president, dies

Raymond “Ray” Rich, a leading figure in the International Hearing Society for half a century, died on March 11 in Cleveland at the age of 90. From 1966 to 1969, he served as president of the organization, then called the National Hearing Aid Society (NHAS), and he was also for many years president of the…

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Moe Bergman, pioneering audiologist and director of the first VA clinic, dies

HERZLIYA, ISRAEL—Moe Bergman, EdD, one of the last remaining founders of audiology, died on February 20 in Herzliya, Israel. He was 97. Dr. Bergman, a native New Yorker who moved to Israel with his wife, Hannah, in 1975, became involved in audiology in the 1930s, long before the term “audiology” was even used. In the…

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Henry Meltsner dies; was co-founder of Hal-Hen and Widex USA

Henry Meltsner, who with his friend and business partner Harold Spar, started Hal-Hen and Widex USA, died January 12 at the age of 92. Not only did the navy buddies start and run two of the most enduring American companies in the hearing industry, they successfully turned them over to the next second generation, their…

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Craig Johnson, former ADA president and advocate for autonomy in audiology, dies

OWINGS MILLS, MD—Craig W. Johnson, a pioneering audiologist who founded and ran the first private audiology practice in Maryland and then became a leading advocate for his profession, died on October 9. A native of Baltimore, Johnson was one of the few audiologists ever to simultaneously hold leadership positions with two major professional audiology organizations.…

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Dr. William F. House dies; otology pioneer developed the first cochlear implant

The following is based on the obituary provided by the House Research Institute.   AURORA, OR–William F. House, MD, who pioneered the cochlear implant, died at his home in Aurora on December 7, at age 89. “William House was considered the Father of Neurotology because of his pioneering development approaches for the removal of acoustic…

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Bob Sandlin, the popular founder of the International Hearing Aid Seminars, dies

The following obituary for Robert Sandlin, PhD, is derived in large part from The Hearing Review, and appears here with the kind permission of that publication. For further tributes to Dr. Sandlin, see this week’s post at Wayne’s World, and look for an upcoming post at Hearing Views.   Robert E. Sandlin, PhD, one of audiology’s best…

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Edgar Villchur, audio inventor who changed the hearing care field, dies at 94

WOODSTOCK, NY–Edgar Villchur, a renowned inventor whose wide-ranging work included breakthroughs in hearing aid technology, died at his home here on Monday, October 17, at the age of 94. Villchur, who was also a prominent educator, writer, and philanthropist, revolutionized the field of high-fidelity equipment with his 1954 invention of the acoustic suspension loudspeaker. This…

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