How to Keep Your Cochlear Implant Working Safely

by Roy Rasmussen   Use of cochlear implants is on the rise. By the end of 2010, approximately 219,000 people worldwide had received a cochlear implant, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Approximately 40 percent of children born profoundly deaf were receiving implants by the end of 2014, a rise of 25 percent…

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Earwax and “Dark Magic”

Genève returned to our office the other day with a hearing aid that was dead for the fourth time this year. The instrument, a high-tech receiver-in-the canal (RIC) model, had a little wax on the dome, but the dome was not plugged. I then checked the internal filter on the receiver. It was completely plugged…

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Shed a new and brighter light on your practice

The longer I practice audiology, the more I appreciate the application of light. I’ll explain. We use light to look into ears and hearing aids, and the quality of the light can greatly affect the quality of our inspection. I recently replaced the old desk light that was located directly above my “grinding machine.” The…

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Helpful Tools, Helpful Suggestions

Let me ask you a question.  As a hearing health care professional, when you send a new CIC (completely-in-the-canal) hearing aid to the factory for repair, do you check it when it comes back? And if you find that it’s ‘dead’, what do you do?  Be careful how you answer; you may be surprised. This…

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Successful Hearing Aid Use, Part 13: A safe and easy guide to earwax removal

Important note: The information in this article is for patients who have been checked by a medical doctor and told that it is all right for them to clean their ears. If you have any ear pain, drainage from your ear, a hole (perforation) in your eardrum, or any other type of ear problem, do…

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remove hearing aid earwax

Successful Hearing Aid Use, part 5: Getting the earwax out

Hearing aids are tiny instruments made with even tinier parts: the microphone, circuit chip, and speaker (receiver). Hearing aids deliver sound into the ear through a narrow “sound tube.” This tube is about the size of the lead in a pencil or a small strand of spaghetti. Because the tube is so tiny, it takes…

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