To help patients communicate better, we need to sharpen our own communication skills

As audiologists and hearing aid specialists, we are all in the communication business. It’s our job to help our patients communicate better. It’s only natural, then, that there will be times and situations in the practice of our profession that we are called upon to make an extra effort to communicate effectively with the people…

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Make Patients Feel the Joy of Hearing Better

Humans are funny creatures. We have a great capacity for logical thought and reasoning, but much of the time we fall back on our primeval emotions: caution, fear, and anxiety. It is easy for us to “think” about something that is good for us – an exercise or diet plan comes to mind, but it…

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How to Help Your Patients Hear Even When the Noise Level is High

When I’m talking with my patients, I like to compare eyeglasses and hearing aids. They are familiar with bifocals and understand how they work for different viewing situations: the upper lens is for distance, the lower lens for close-up work. Similarly, hearing aids have multiple programs that are adjusted for specific listening situations. The first…

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can hear but cant understand words

“I can hear, but I can’t understand the words”

If you listed the most common problems that your hearing aid patients complain of when they return to your office, number one on the list would be, “I can hear, but I can’t understand the words.” Or, to put it differently, “The hearing aids are giving me more sound, but this sound does not help…

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Use the window of hearing to help patients with poor hearing

If you are looking for a simple, bare-bones definition of audiology, here it is: Audiology is the profession that figures out and fixes difficult hearing problems. People come to us and say, “I can’t hear…” and complete their sentence with phrases like “…my wife, the TV, my grandchildren, what people are saying when I’m in…

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Treat every patient like a patient—even your friends

I have a Standard Operational Procedure (SOP) that I try to use every time I see a patient. This SOP can be described simply as: look in the ear, look in the hearing aid, measure the amplification, check to be sure the amplification is providing good hearing, and listen to–and solve–any problems the patient may…

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