Don’t take chances when you’re taking ear impressions

Those of us who have worked in this field for years have taken thousands of ear impressions. And, just like nurses who give injections every day, it is easy for us to become desensitized to the importance and potential risks of this procedure. Taking an ear impression is not a risk-free process. The safety of…

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Checklists help keep practices on course

Airline pilots always use checklists to land and take off. Regardless of how many years of experience they have or how confident they are in their abilities, they still consult checklists to make absolutely certain they do not deviate from their standard routine. In an emergency or other difficult situation, following a checklist helps keep…

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Make “Look, listen, evaluate, and solve” your standard operating procedure

Most patients have some problem or a concern about their hearing aids when they return to our office for a follow-up visit. Sometimes, we can quickly remediate their problem by unplugging a sound tube or changing a battery. Other times there is something in the fitting that needs adjusting or we can help the patient…

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The fine art of demonstrating the efficacy of a noise-reduction program

In my two previous blog posts, I discussed various ways of clearly showing patients the benefits of hearing aids. I explained how to conduct demonstrations using test words and pulsed warbled test tones. Today I want to talk about demonstrating a hearing aid’s ability to handle “background noise.” But be warned, this topic is fraught…

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Two ways to show patients their hearing aids are helping

(The first of three parts) If you are an Audiologist, it is easy to delude yourself into thinking that people will listen to you and accept what you are saying. You spent a lot of time and energy going to graduate school, and you have a license to practice Audiology. So, because you are a…

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Satisfy hard-to-fit patients with your impression-taking and earmold expertise

If you are working with a hard-to-please patient, I suggest that you introduce two concepts at the same time: maximum comfort (what feels good to wear) and maximum hearing (the fitting that will give the patient the “best” hearing). When a new hearing aid user is finicky, you need to win instant approval from the…

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