How Listening Programs Can Greatly Improve Your Patients’ Hearing

The greatest joy that our profession brings us is to help people hear well. People come to the office hearing poorly. They leave hearing better. They leave happy. And they leave us with a deep sense of accomplishment and satisfaction. Today I want to add another tool to your toolbox. It a hearing aid feature…

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The fine art of demonstrating the efficacy of a noise-reduction program

In my two previous blog posts, I discussed various ways of clearly showing patients the benefits of hearing aids. I explained how to conduct demonstrations using test words and pulsed warbled test tones. Today I want to talk about demonstrating a hearing aid’s ability to handle “background noise.” But be warned, this topic is fraught…

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In fitting hearing aids, be very careful when you amplify the low frequencies

If you are new to audiology, be careful when you read this article. Today I want to tackle an advanced concept, so you need to have considerable experience and well-developed intuition when you attempt to employ these ideas. Listed below are hearing thresholds for six patients. For the sake of simplicity I’m showing you their…

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Fitting Hearing Aids for the Bowling Alley: A Triumph for Trial and Error

Manufacturers build a lot of “help” for us into their hearing aid fitting software. This includes many suggestions for helping our patients hear in a wide variety of listening conditions. But sometimes, you can find a better fitting—a really excellent fitting–by doing a little trial-and-error rather than depending on the manufacturer’s suggestions. Many years ago…

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Setting a Real-Ear Target for Hearing in High-Level Background Noise

A few years ago audiologists spent a lot of time arguing about which real-ear target was best. Now, we don’t usually discuss targets any more, as most of us rely on the manufacturer’s software to give us an estimate of the sound produced by the hearing aid. (We recognize that this is a mistake, but…

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How to Help Your Patients Hear Even When the Noise Level is High

When I’m talking with my patients, I like to compare eyeglasses and hearing aids. They are familiar with bifocals and understand how they work for different viewing situations: the upper lens is for distance, the lower lens for close-up work. Similarly, hearing aids have multiple programs that are adjusted for specific listening situations. The first…

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