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Report Cards for Hearing Aids and Hearables, part 3

The Hearing Disruptions series seeks to cover the rapid changes taking place in hearing healthcare. Today’s post is culled from recent topics presented to the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) Committee on Accessible and Affordable Hearing Health Care for Adults.     A Bi-Model Market for Hearing Aids and Ear Amplifiers Holly Hosford-Dunn, Ph.D.  Presented at the…

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Checklists help keep practices on course

Airline pilots always use checklists to land and take off. Regardless of how many years of experience they have or how confident they are in their abilities, they still consult checklists to make absolutely certain they do not deviate from their standard routine. In an emergency or other difficult situation, following a checklist helps keep…

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Making the Case for Hearing Aids: Hearing Is Believing

In his previous post, published June 11, Dr. Robert Martin explained the importance of giving patients a “black and white demonstration” that clearly proves the benefit of aided hearing over unaided hearing. This week, Bob continues his three-part discussion of how to provide compelling demonstrations.   There are many different types of demonstrations you can…

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Two ways to show patients their hearing aids are helping

(The first of three parts) If you are an Audiologist, it is easy to delude yourself into thinking that people will listen to you and accept what you are saying. You spent a lot of time and energy going to graduate school, and you have a license to practice Audiology. So, because you are a…

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Successful Hearing Aid Use, part 3: A hearing aid—by itself—does not work

By Robert L. Martin I am sometimes asked, “What about the hearing aids I see advertised in the newspaper or on the Internet?” The simple answer is “These hearing aids do not work.” To understand my answer, you need to know how hearing aids are fitted. There are many critical stages to a hearing aid…

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All in the Family

Like all of us, the question of “What do you do?” comes up regularly.  When I say, “I’m an audiologist,”  I often get blank looks.  As all audiologists know, there usually needs to be a tag line.  My tag line generally goes something like this, “I take care of people with hearing loss.”  It’s getting better…I…

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