Evaluation and Management of Adult Auditory Processing Disorders: Part II

Jennifer Shinn, PhD, Professor and Chief of Audiology, Department of Otolaryngology, University of Kentucky Medical Center Trey Cline, AuD, Clinical Audiologist, Department of Otolaryngology, University of Kentucky Medical Center   Introduction: As you will remember in Part I, we presented the case of a 39-year-old male who was diagnosed with an auditory processing deficit (APD).…

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Evaluation and Management of Adult Auditory Processing Disorders: Part 1

Jennifer Shinn, PhD, Professor and Chief of Audiology, Department of Otolaryngology, University of Kentucky Medical Center Trey Cline, AuD, Clinical Audiologist, Department of Otolaryngology, University of Kentucky Medical Center   Introduction: A significant part of our clinical practice is evaluating and managing patients with auditory processing disorders (APD). All too often adults are overlooked when…

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Highly reverberant environments: A commentary on an interesting case study

Frank Musiek, Ph.D.  It is well-known that highly reverberant rooms make communication difficult for all people.  This is especially the case for individuals with hearing loss and those with central auditory dysfunction. Highly reverberant rooms or hallways are often termed “echoey” by the lay public. Schools have recognized   this problem and do their best…

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Congenital and Acquired Amusia as Categories of CAPD (Part 1)

Carrie M. Clancy, B.A., M.M. Graduate Student, Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona   Commonly called “tone deafness”, amusia is defined as the inability to recognize or reproduce musical tones. Amusia can be congenital (present at birth) or acquired sometime later in life, as from brain damage due to stroke or…

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