Congenital and Acquired Amusia as Categories of CAPD (Part 1)

Carrie M. Clancy, B.A., M.M. Graduate Student, Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona   Commonly called “tone deafness”, amusia is defined as the inability to recognize or reproduce musical tones. Amusia can be congenital (present at birth) or acquired sometime later in life, as from brain damage due to stroke or…

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Diagnosis and Treatment of Amblyaudia, a type of Auditory Processing Disorder

[A preview of a the presentation at Pathways for AAA by Deborah Moncrief] Amblyaudia is a deficit in binaural integration, a process that begins with excitatory and inhibitory activation in the medial and lateral superior olivary complexes of the auditory brainstem (Tollin, 2003).  Interaural timing and intensity differences are used to detect coincident signals and…

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Classrooms, noise and auditory processing disorders

Mridula Sharma 1,2 Associate Professor  1Department of Linguistics, Australian Hearing Hub, 16 University Avenue, Macquarie University New South Wales 2109, Australia 2The HEARing CRC, 550 Swanston Street, Audiology, Hearing and Speech Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia       Communication in quiet is a rare occurrence. Noise is ubiquitous, causing interference in…

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Rationale for the Use of Sound Field Systems for Children with Central Auditory Nervous System Dysfunction: Part 2

Steve Bornstein, Ph.D., C.C.C./Audiology Associate Professor University of New Hampshire Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders     Abstract Children with Central Auditory Nervous System (CANS) Dysfunction have been observed to potentially have several deficits, such as difficulty with temporal tasks, degraded speech, time-compressed speech, and auditory pattern recognition. However, perhaps the greatest overall deficit…

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