Congenital and Acquired Amusia as Categories of CAPD (Part 2)

Carrie M. Clancy, B.A., M.M. Graduate Student, Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona   Part 1 of this article provided a brief overview of congenital and acquired amusia as forms of CAPD. Part 2, presented here, is intended to suggest potential avenues for continued research regarding both congenital and acquired amusias.…

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Congenital and Acquired Amusia as Categories of CAPD (Part 1)

Carrie M. Clancy, B.A., M.M. Graduate Student, Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona   Commonly called “tone deafness”, amusia is defined as the inability to recognize or reproduce musical tones. Amusia can be congenital (present at birth) or acquired sometime later in life, as from brain damage due to stroke or…

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Decrement in Noise Test (DeNT): A Clinical Measure of Partially Filled Gap Detection Performance

by Julianne M. Ceruti, Au.D., Ph.D., Leslie Bernstein, Ph.D., and Frank Musiek, Ph.D.   The Decrement in Noise Test (DeNT) is a clinically oriented procedure modeled after the GIN test that employs both partially filled gaps (i.e., decrements) and full gaps. This test was developed to improve clinical assessment of temporal resolution that addresses the…

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Reflections on the cochlear nucleus (CNu) and some early clinical studies

Frank E. Musiek   There is no question that considerable research has been conducted on the cochlear nucleus in recent years. Anatomists, physiologists, psycho-acousticians, audiologists and others have made contributions to our understanding of the CNu. However, in reflection on some current research of the CNu I kept thinking about some very early research which…

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