The Contralateral Ear Effect on Tests of Central Auditory Function: An Introduction

Frank Musiek     Introduction   Back in the 1950’s Ettore Bocca and his Italian colleagues (Bocca, Calearo, Cassinari, 1954) were the first to develop and make significant clinical use of central auditory tests. They had learned that the pure tone audiogram was not useful in reflecting deficits of the central auditory nervous system (CANS).…

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Sound Localization in Split-brain Subjects

Renata Filippini, PhD. Post-doctoral researcher at the University of Arizona and University of Sao Paulo   The construction of an accurate spatial map is key for localization of sound sources not only for communication, but also for survival. Being able to figure out the characteristics of the environment allow us to interact with it in a…

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Neuromorphological Abnormalities and Central Auditory Processing Disorders: An Overview

by Chloe E Robbins, The University of Arizona The human central auditory nervous system (CANS) is responsible for processing and maintaining the integrity of sound stimuli, both simple and complex, from the peripheral auditory system for interpretation at the cortical level. When pathologies arise in this system, abilities such as understanding speech, localization, lateralization, and…

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Commentary on “Effects of Low Pass Filtering on Ear Asymmetry in Dichotic Listening and Some Uncontrolled Error Sources” (Spreen and Boucher, 1970)

[gview file=”https://hearinghealthmatters.org/pathways/files/2016/02/Corrected-View-Article.pdf”] Comment: Though some aspects of this article we may not agree with— there is an interesting finding that may need reiterated in the current research world. Progressive filtering of the high frequency energy of dichotically presented words appears to compromise the right ear advantage (REA). The REA has been well recognized for many…

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