Can Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials Demonstrate An Electrophysiological Release From Masking In Noise?

Andrew Stuart1 & Sarah P. Faucette2 1Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 2Department of Otolaryngology & Communicative Sciences, The University of Mississippi School of Medicine, Jackson, MS   Clinicians typically evaluate auditory function with behavioral testing. When patients cannot be assessed with behavioral techniques, auditory evoked potentials are often employed.…

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Electrocochleography As A Means To Assess Auditory Function Following Noise Exposure

Andrew Stuart1 & Alyson Butler Lake2 1Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 2Blue Ridge Ear, Nose, Throat & Plastic Surgery, Lynchburg, VA   Electrocochleography (ECochG) has been employed to assess stimulus-related cochlear potentials and the compound action potential (AP) of the auditory nerve. The cochlear potentials include the cochlear microphonic (CM)…

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The Clinical Utility of P300 Evoked Responses in Post-Sport-Related Concussion Evaluation

By: Stephanie A. Waryasz, Au.D., CCC-A, F-AAA   Sport-related concussion is a type of injury that tends to produce subtle anatomical abnormalities on the microscopic level within the brain (Gaetz & Weinberg, 2000; Gaetz, Goodman, & Weinberg, 2000; Barth, Freeman, Broshek, & Verney, 2001).  These types of injuries may be asymptomatic and remain unidentified through…

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Auditory Evoked Potentials in Autism

By Hillary Siddons, AuD Candidate at UConn Introduction Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of multifaceted neurodevelopment disorders, characterized by significant social impairments, communication difficulties, and restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior or activities (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). ASD is a lifelong disorder that affects approximately 5.7 to 21.9 per 1,000 children, and is disproportionality…

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