Capitalizing the Ability of the Auditory System to Process Stimuli without Active Attention

Vishakha W. Rawool, PhD Professor and Director of Graduate Study in Audiology West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA Email: VWRawool@mail.wvu.edu     The auditory system is capable of processing auditory stimuli without active attention as summarized in Rawool (2016a). This article is designed to review a few findings related to auditory processing without active…

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Classrooms, noise and auditory processing disorders

Mridula Sharma 1,2 Associate Professor  1Department of Linguistics, Australian Hearing Hub, 16 University Avenue, Macquarie University New South Wales 2109, Australia 2The HEARing CRC, 550 Swanston Street, Audiology, Hearing and Speech Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia       Communication in quiet is a rare occurrence. Noise is ubiquitous, causing interference in…

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Rationale for the Use of Sound Field Systems for Children with Central Auditory Nervous System Dysfunction: Part 2

Steve Bornstein, Ph.D., C.C.C./Audiology Associate Professor University of New Hampshire Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders     Abstract Children with Central Auditory Nervous System (CANS) Dysfunction have been observed to potentially have several deficits, such as difficulty with temporal tasks, degraded speech, time-compressed speech, and auditory pattern recognition. However, perhaps the greatest overall deficit…

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Loudness Recruitment: A Commentary

Frank E. Musiek, Ph.D. University of Arizona   Auditory loudness recruitment at one time was a popular phrase among audiologists. In fact, in some of the early books devoted to clinical audiology, chapters about measuring recruitment, were often a focus (see Katz, 1972). In modern-day audiology, however, recruitment is a seldom used word. I would…

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