Best of 2017: The Johns Hopkins Study on Hearing and Cognition

This post, originally published on September 6, 2017. was the most read post in The Audiology Condition this year. Starting in 2010 Dr Frank Lin and colleagues commenced publishing results of studies of hearing loss and dementia, arriving at essentially the same conclusions using two paradigms and two different, large subject cohorts.  At the time,…

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Aging and Hearing Loss: Data-Driven Studies for Consumers and Audiologists

For years, our field and industry have been bandying around rule-of-thumb statistics, chief among them that somewhere between 25-50% of people 65 and over have hearing loss that is sufficient to interfere with normal communication.  Who knows where that statistic came from? It’s a heuristic that’s gained the mantel of truth over time.  And the stated range of 25…

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Life, Longevity,Cognitive Decline, Hearing Loss… More Connected Than We Used to Think

HHTM Staff: For several years, we’ve been reporting on correlations linking hearing loss and Alzheimers, depression, cognitive decline, social isolation, general health, and Quality of Life (QoL) measures.  Correlation does not imply causality, but the data keep coming, forging stronger links between healthy hearing and healthy living.  November is also National Alzheimer’s Awareness month and…

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Noise versus Silence

Noise will continue to be the star at HHTM, in many guises:  sounds of a bat, rude cell phone use, and elitist intellectual-profiling.  Silence emerged as the white knight of tranquility, civil behavior, superior intellect, and upper class entitlement.  It’s an interesting and entertaining juxtaposition of Good and Bad, especially considering our mainly urban lifestyles and…

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Call of the Wild: Noises You Need to Hear Even if You Don’t Want To

HHTM Staff: This section has been highlighting noise of all types. Unscientific polls in our offices asked clients on their preference for noisy (20% voted for it) or silent (80%want it) lifestyles. In general, the research and the readers agree that noise distracts, interferes with speech understanding, and contributes to cognitive overload. All well and…

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