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Educational Impact Matrix for Students with Hearing Loss

The Michigan Department of Education has put together a matrix for estimating the educational impact of hearing loss. It is very useful in helping families and educators think about their students with hearing loss. Points are assigned for different factors.

A limited description of the matrix is below.

 

Audiological factors

 

The first factor is degree of hearing loss and speech perception. For example the more severe hearing loss, and the poorer the speech perception the more points a child would receive.

 

Language/vocabulary

 

Language and vocabulary includes the level of language and vocabulary skills acquired as measured by standardized assessments and/or English Language Arts Core Standards and includes student’s use of language for interaction with peers and teachers.

For example if a child is functioning at one year below grade level they would receive 4 points, two years below, 8 points etc.

 

Functional listening skills

 

Functional listening skills includes the student’s ability to use listening skills in a variety of settings. A child who understand connected speech would receive 0 points, if she can obtain class content given cues about the topic and understands class content in small groups would get 4 points, children who understand part of class content in small groups would receive 8 points etc

 

Use of amplification devices

 

Children who use amplification full time at home and school would receive 0 points, children who use amplification at school but not at home would receive 2 points, children who use amplification inconsistently would receive 3 points etc.

 

Academic/vocational performance

 

Academic/vocational performance includes the level of academic progress and/or career-related learning as the student’s need for accommodations or modifications.

Children who are proficient on state assessments for ELA would receive 0 points, children who are partially proficient would receive 2 points, students who are not proficient would receive 4 points etc.

 

Personal adjustment and transition

 

Personal adjustment and transition includes the level of self advocacy for technology and/or accommodations as well as skills necessary for transitions including graduation and/or change of levels. Students who know and use resources for access in familiar and novel settings would receive 0 points, children who know and use resources in familiar settings would receive 2 points, children who use few resources would receive 3 points etc

 

Using the information

 

Students who have scores of 0-8 would receive 0-14 minutes/week of services. Children who receive scores of 9-16 would receive 9-20 minutes/week of services. Students who have scores of 17-24 would receive 21-37 minutes/week of services, and students who have scores of 25-32 would receive 35-50 minutes of services/week.

Students who have scores of 0-8 would receive 0-14 minutes/week of services. Children who receive scores of 9-16 would receive 9-20 minutes/week of services. Students who have scores of 17-24 would receive 21-37 minutes/week of services, and students who have scores of 25-32 would receive 35-50 minutes of services/week.

 

My thoughts

 

I think this matrix is an excellent way of gathering information but I do not think that the level of services that are being recommend are not sufficient.

In my view, if a child is functioning one year below grade level they should be receiving one hour/day or services to try and build skills. If the child is two years behind I think they need to receive two hours/day of services. My goal is to have the child catch up and function at grade level and 21 minutes/week is not going to get us there.    

About Jane Madell

Jane Madell has a consulting practice in pediatric audiology. She is an audiologist, speech-language pathologist, and LSLS auditory verbal therapist, with a BA from Emerson College and an MA and PhD from the University of Wisconsin. Her 45+ years experience ranges from Deaf Nursery programs to positions at the League for the Hard of Hearing (Director), Long Island College Hospital, Downstate Medical Center, Beth Israel Medical Center/New York Eye and Ear Infirmary as director of the Hearing and Learning Center and Cochlear Implant Center. Jane has taught at the University of Tennessee, Columbia University, Downstate Medical School, and Albert Einstein Medical School, published 5 books, and written numerous books chapters and journal articles, and is a well known international lecturer.

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