Congenital and Acquired Amusia as Categories of CAPD (Part 1)

Carrie M. Clancy, B.A., M.M. Graduate Student, Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona   Commonly called “tone deafness”, amusia is defined as the inability to recognize or reproduce musical tones. Amusia can be congenital (present at birth) or acquired sometime later in life, as from brain damage due to stroke or…

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Cognitive and Educational factors: Their influence in Auditory Processing Performance

Eliane Schochat1, Renata Filippini1, Frank Musiek 1 Faculdade de Medicina FMUSP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, BR Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is projected to be within the top 15 leading causes of burden of disease by 2030 (Mathers & Loncar, 2006 ). Acquired hearing loss can negatively affect mental health, participation in interpersonal relations, and…

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An Account of Some Relationships Between Otoacoustic Emissions and the Olivocochlear Bundle

Aaron Whiteley   The focused examination of otoacoustic emissions began in the 1940s with Georg von Bekesy. Inspired, yet unconvinced by Helmholtz’ idea that the cochlea consisted of resonant structures, Bekesy developed an intricate method of examination that would lead to the place theory and traveling wave theory (Hall, 2000). Bekesy’s experiments built the foundation…

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