Binaural Improvement in Normal and Defective Ears in a Background of Other Voices: A Historical Article Review from the Archives

by Nicole Denny, Alyssa Everett, and Frank Musiek, The University of Arizona   Binaural Improvement in Normal and Defective Ears in a Background of Other Voices is a classic article from 1971 by J. D. Harris and C. Myers.  Previous research by Harris in 1965 demonstrated that when a subject is asked to answer a…

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Sound Localization in Split-brain Subjects

Renata Filippini, PhD. Post-doctoral researcher at the University of Arizona and University of Sao Paulo   The construction of an accurate spatial map is key for localization of sound sources not only for communication, but also for survival. Being able to figure out the characteristics of the environment allow us to interact with it in a…

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Neuromorphological Abnormalities and Central Auditory Processing Disorders: An Overview

by Chloe E Robbins, The University of Arizona The human central auditory nervous system (CANS) is responsible for processing and maintaining the integrity of sound stimuli, both simple and complex, from the peripheral auditory system for interpretation at the cortical level. When pathologies arise in this system, abilities such as understanding speech, localization, lateralization, and…

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Cochlear Dynorphins, Stress and Tinnitus

Tony L. Sahley, School of Health Sciences, Cleveland State University Subjective tinnitus is a clinical disorder, defined traditionally as a perception of sound (a tone, a hum or a hiss) that is experienced in the absence of an externally evoking auditory stimulus. For this reason, subjective tinnitus is often referred to as a phantom auditory perception.…

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